Massachusetts

  • The first-in-the-nation offshore wind training facility will be located at the Massachusetts Maritime Academy.

    In late October, with much fanfare, Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker, Stephen Pike, CEO of the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center and many others joined officials from the Massachusetts Maritime Academy (MMA) to launch the first-in-the-nation offshore wind crew transfer training facility. The group of state and college representatives also officially christened a new training vessel. The event underscored the efforts at MMA to both support, but also take full advantage of what stakeholders believe is the advent of offshore wind here in the United States.

    The training facility, which received a total of $1.73 million from the Administration and Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC), will provide education, training and certification to thousands of residents, including Mass Maritime cadets, as well as skilled labor including electricians, pile drivers, divers and welders, enabling them to work in the emerging offshore wind industry. But, it is important to note that this isn’t intended to be the traditional ‘mariner’ training that the storied Buzzards Bay campus has become known for. Instead, the fledgling effort is nod to the new skill sets and trades which will be need in the offshore energy sectors in the decades to come. Most of those workers won’t be trained mariners.

    For starters, the training facility represents an investment by the Commonwealth to grow a workforce for the offshore wind industry, which will support the construction and operation of Vineyard Wind’s 800-megawatt project, which was selected by the Commonwealth’s Electric District Companies in May 2018 under the state’s first competitive procurement for offshore wind. Eventually, it hopes to support training for myriad projects from coast-to-coast.

    The project, a partnership between Mass Maritime, state government and industry, heralds the first domestic training facility accredited to provide a full safety training program required for workers in offshore wind. The offshore wind training facility will provide critical infrastructure that will give both college students and adults seeking new careers the necessary skills and certification to work in the emerging industry.

    In total, MMA received more than $1.73 million in grants from the Baker-Polito Administration and MassCEC to support the development of its first-in-the-nation facility and basic safety program. In a nutshell, the crew transfer training facility is a critical component of a comprehensive safety training program to be offered by Mass Maritime. The facility supports safety training for workers moving from relatively small crew transfer vessels to the fixed support structures of wind turbines in the open seas.

    (Photo: Massachusetts Maritime Academy)

    Safety first
    Initially, MMA will focus on Basic Safety Training for the offshore wind industry with a course comprised of five modules: First Aid, Manual Handling, Fire Awareness, Working at Heights, and Sea Survival. Some of the training will take place in MMA’s newly constructed indoor climbing facility and on the Crew Transfer Training Facility located on the MMA’s pier in Buzzard’s Bay. Instructors will teach students how to safely transfer from the vessel to an offshore wind turbine. MMA partnered with the largest provider of GWO training in the world, Relyon Nutec, to help train MMA instructors to deliver these courses using GWO-approved and globally recognized curriculum.

    The new jobs anticipated to support the offshore wind industry include a wide range of types, including engineers, trade workers, surveyors, scientists, technicians, managers and seafarers. In fact, the role of the wind turbine technician has been one of the fastest growing occupations in the United States in recent years. All that said, as skilled as these personnel might be at their core missions, most know little to nothing about maritime protocols and safety. That’s where MMA comes in.

    (Photo: Massachusetts Maritime Academy)

    Developing offshore wind training and safety standards
    As MMA becomes an early adopter of these emerging safety standards, the United States and a number of states, as well as offshore wind developers haven’t been sitting on their hands, either.

    The Offshore Wind Jobs and Opportunity Act (the Job Act), introduced this year and now pending in Congress would provide up to $25 million in federal grants to colleges, unions, and nonprofits to prepare “a new generation of offshore wind workers.”

    Separately, a number of states have also developed programs for offshore wind training and development programs. Massachusetts itself awarded $721,500 this year to six academic institutions to further offshore wind workforce training and development. For its part, MMA put the award towards funding construction of an offshore wind crew transfer training facility and establishing the GWO courses.

    (Photo: Massachusetts Maritime Academy)

    Offshore wind farm training for seafarers
    The academy’s newest training vessel is a basic twin engine Carolina skiff with some modifications to the bow to allow simulated approaches to an offshore wind turbine. In essence, it looks similar to what you might find on a crew transfer vessel, just on a smaller scale. In addition to that, and leveraging some of the funds received from the Clean Energy Center, MMA constructed an additional pier which will serve as additional infrastructure for the rapidly developing crew transfer training facility.

    Captain Michael Burns, Director of MMA’s Center for Maritime and Professional Training, explained, “That’s an aluminum structure that sits out on the end of the pier – it’s bolted to the pier – and it simulates the transition piece of an offshore wind turbine. In other words, there are heavy fender rails that the boat will push up against and then a recessed ladder that leads up to a platform about eight feet above the deck of the float. Students will practice and learn how to safely transfer to and from the vessel.”

    That part of the course involves “Sea Survival,” and it’s just one of five modules that make up basic safety training for the offshore wind industry. The Global Wind Organization (GWO) is the international organization that developed this curriculum. Many offshore wind companies now mandate use of training standards developed by GWO, which a non-profit founded by wind turbine manufacturers and operators. GWO training courses must be taught by GWO-certified training providers.

    At Mass. Maritime, the maximum class size will be 12, and Burns says that the school hopes to train as many as 250 wind professionals annually. The entire basic safety program will span six days, involving five modules and is intended to be about 80% practical training with the balance in a classroom. That, says Burns, lends itself well to the assessment-based training that the school already imbeds into its curriculum. And, while this training regimen has nothing formally to do with tradition IMO-mandated STCW training, there are parallels to STCW where the interests of maritime safety intersect with the rapidly emerging non-traditional work roles that offshore wind demands.

    (Photo: Massachusetts Maritime Academy)

    The winds of change
    The U.S. Department of Energy estimates 43,000 new jobs will be created in the offshore wind market by 2030. The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center recently published an assessment of jobs and economic impacts associated with development of 1,600 megawatts in Massachusetts alone. That study estimated that over the next decade, offshore wind farms will create as many as 3,000 jobs and generate economic impact that could reach $2 billion regionally.

    As the U.S. offshore wind industry grows, multiple projects are in the development stages off of the Atlantic coast. Eventually, the total megawatt capacity of U.S. offshore wind farms is anticipated to reach 22,000 by 2030 and 43,000 by 2050. But, not if there aren’t sufficient numbers of trained personnel to make that happen.

    Before any of it can come to fruition, ensuring a safe offshore workplace will be ‘job one.’ That’s not a new idea, but for the thousands of previously land based personnel being mobilized to meet future offshore technical demands, it is critically important. Out in front of that effort, Mass Maritime is once again rising to the challenge.

    Rear Admiral Francis X. McDonald, USMS, President of Massachusetts Maritime Academy (Photo: Massachusetts Maritime Academy)

    “Massachusetts Maritime Academy has been educating mariners and energy engineers for more than a century, so we are best positioned to support this important initiative for the Commonwealth and the nation,” said President of Massachusetts Maritime Academy Rear Admiral Francis X. McDonald, USMS.

    The evolving role of the nation’s maritime academies is destined to meet the changing realities of the domestic waterfront. For example, a 1970s era MMA graduate therefore might be surprised to learn what the academy has become, and all in just a few short decades. On the other hand, no one will be surprised to see what comes next. The changing offshore winds will see to that.

    (Photo: Massachusetts Maritime Academy)

  • Bay, MA 02532 Tel: (508) 830-5012  Email: blima@maritime.edu Website: www.maritime.edu President: Rear Admiral Richard Gurnon The Company: Massachusetts Maritime Academy is one of nine Massachusetts State Universities. Established in 1891, the academy now offers seven undergraduate and two master’s

  • VLCC Tankers, Inc. VI have applied to the Maritime Administration for Title XI guarantees to aid in financing the retrofitting of the tankers Massachusetts, New York, and Maryland, respectively, in compliance with new U.S. Coast Guard requirements. Each of the 265,000-dwt, 35,000- shp tankers

  • Chevron Shipping. Prior to that he was superintendent engineer of Tankers Company in New York City. He holds B.S. degrees in engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Massachusetts Maritime Academy. Schnitzer-Levin Marine, part of the Schnitzer Group of companies, sells and

  • The Tenth Naval Hydrodynamics Symposium will be held June 24-28, 1974 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Mass. This internationally recognized symposium has been held biennially since 1956, alternately in this country and abroad. This year, the symposium is being sponsored

  • Bay, MA  02532 Tel: (508) 830-5012 Email: blima@maritime.edu Website: www.maritime.edu President: RADM Fran McDonald   The Company: Massachusetts Maritime Academy offers seven undergraduate Bachelor of Science degrees and two graduate Masters of Science programs. The regiment of cadets is

  • , installation, and operations & maintenance of an offshore wind energy project.” The program has a budget of $1.2 million for 2020.Massachusetts awarded $721,500 earlier this year to six academic institutions for offshore wind workforce training and development programs. One of the recipients

  • to the construction, installation, and operations & maintenance of an offshore wind energy project.” The program has a budget of $1.2 million for 2020.Massachusetts awarded $721,500 earlier this year to six academic institutions for offshore wind workforce training and development programs. One of the recipients

  • that the most effective training is on the water, at the helm. While training on real-world vessels can be tough due to time and safety constraints, Massachusetts Maritime Academy maintains its unique solutions: the Manned Model Shiphandling Program on the Great Herring Pond.   The Manned Model Shiphandling

  • and chief operating officer. Mr. Gwyn brings over 30 years of marine industry experience to his new position and is joining Bird- Johnson from the Massachusetts Shipbuilders Corporation, where he had been president and chief executive officer for the past three years. In his new position, Mr. Gwyn is second

  • secondary sewage treatment facilities will be constructed along with an effluent outfall tunnel extending nine miles under the ocean floor in Massachusetts Bay. The vessels are designed to permit the rapid securing of trailers to mate with purpose-built shoreside transfer bridges and incorporate many

  • and an application form, call or write: Dr. Paul Brown, Director, Advanced Study Programs, Center for Advanced Engineering Study, Room 9- 335, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, Telephone: 617-253-6161, Telex: 92- 1473, Telecopier: 617-258-8831. If you have questions about

  • MN Aug-20#74  & Distributors
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    August 2020 - Marine News page: 74

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  • MN Aug-20#10  trol Engineering, LLC, a Massachusetts-based acoustical 
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    August 2020 - Marine News page: 10

    analy- licenses. Glosten is also the parent company to Noise Con- sis with practical, experience-based design. The employee- trol Engineering, LLC, a Massachusetts-based acoustical August 2020 10 M

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    August 2020 - Marine News page: 2

    ............................................................68 Armstrong Marine USA ..................................................................14 Massachusetts Maritime Academy .............................................. 74 BAE Systems ...............................................................

  • MR Jul-20#20  Summit held on the Massachusetts 
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    July 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 20

    and Admiral Buono of USMMA during last have been assessed for the same skills at the managerial level: year’s Maritime Education Summit held on the Massachusetts ¦ Knowledge of shipboard personnel management and training Maritime Academy campus. During their presentations both of ¦ A knowledge of related

  • MR Jun-20#46  also requires proper 
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    June 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 46

    the clients are located, such 800-megawatt Vineyard Wind 1 project the AWEA reports, companies have an- a decision of course also requires proper in Massachusetts was initially scheduled nounced well over a billion dollars in due diligence to ensure compliance with to commence last year until federal regu-

  • MT Jun-20#22  System  Quincy, Massachusetts, has delivered 
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    June 2020 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 22

    unmanned boats (USVs) can tow Mission Systems Bluefn Robotics of ter, form our concepts, understand our the Australian Minesweeping System Quincy, Massachusetts, has delivered Photo: General Dynamics Mission Systems Bluefn Robotics/Royal UK Navy June 2020 22 MT

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    May 2020 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 42

    UUVs are all being designed demic, and Huntinington Ingalls Industries Unmanned Systems with modularity and fexibility in mind is no exception. “Massachusetts, the base of our Unmanned to ensure compatibility across many dif- Systems business unit, is currently under regulations that re- ferent mission

  • MN May-20#40  to haul in 
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    May 2020 - Marine News page: 40

    the years, Marciano the competition between commercial blue?n tuna ?shermen and his crew have competed against other boats to haul in in Gloucester, Massachusetts. The show has run on National as many tuna as they can and even wore the “Wicked Tuna” Geographic since 2012, with its ninth season set to premiere

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    April 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 64

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  • MR Apr-20#34  wants 9000+ MW, whereas  Massachusetts is looking at 1500)
    April 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 34

    they have the most solicitations out. “For example New York neatly summarizes his companies value proposition. “We’ve spe- wants 9000+ MW, whereas Massachusetts is looking at 1500 to cialized in the Northeast (U.S.) for a number of years, we know 2000 MW.” the local ports, the local infrastructure and

  • MR Apr-20#14  every other East 
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    April 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 14

    is a “stacking effect” at one the Vineyard Wind permitting delay. port, there could be ripples of delays at virtually every other East Offshore Massachusetts, the 800-megawatt Vineyard Wind Coast port. is supposed to be the frst offshore, utility-scale wind project. The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management

  • MN Jan-20#38  wind market by 
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    January 2020 - Marine News page: 38

    wind demands. THE WINDS OF CHANGE The U.S. Department of Energy estimates 43,000 new jobs will be created in the offshore wind market by 2030. The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center recently published an assessment of jobs and economic impacts associated with development of 1,600 megawatts in Mas- sachusetts

  • MN Jan-20#36 OFFSHORE WIND
“The Massachusetts Maritime 
Academy)
    January 2020 - Marine News page: 36

    OFFSHORE WIND “The Massachusetts Maritime Academy has been educating mariners and energy engineers for more than a century, so we are best positioned to support this important initiative for the Commonwealth and the nation.” – Rear Admiral Francis X. McDonald, USMS, President of Massachusetts

  • MN Jan-20#35  will 
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    January 2020 - Marine News page: 35

    OFFSHORE WIND The ? rst-in-the-nation offshore wind training facility will be located at the Massachusetts Maritime Academy. By Joseph Keefe n late October, with much fanfare, Massachusetts Gover- by the Commonwealth to grow a workforce for the off- nor Charlie Baker, Stephen Pike, CEO of the Massachu-

  • MN Jan-20#8  across the mar-
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    January 2020 - Marine News page: 8

    port, including analytics Ewing Keefe sional magazines. He is a and communications, to 1980 (Deck) graduate of businesses across the mar- the Massachusetts Mari- itime spectrum. time Academy. Klaus Reichardt is CEO Bob Lawler is currently and founder of Waterless General Manger for Boston Co

  • MN Dec-19#52  for overall 
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    December 2019 - Marine News page: 52

    Marine Industrial Group. Massport Board Votes to Approve Port Director lence by the Maritime Museum of Verble will be responsible for overall The Massachusetts Port Authority British Columbia in a ceremony held coordination, supervision and inspec- December 2019 52 M

  • MN Dec-19#30  equation – has been  en, Massachusetts upgraded its MES life)
    December 2019 - Marine News page: 30

    Cape May-Lewes Ferry (CMLF) Another early adopter, the Steamship Authority in Fairhav- – at least on the domestic side of the equation – has been en, Massachusetts upgraded its MES life raft evacuation one of few early adopters of this important tool. system in 2007 and this equipment is ? tted on board

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    December 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 37

    LDM tablet. MIT to Design Ship for Oldendorff HHI Power System Maximizes Ship Ef? ciency Oldendorff Carriers signed a research agreement with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s (MIT) Center yundai Heavy Industries for Bits and Atoms (CBA) to make its (HHI) and Korea Shipbuild- vessels more

  • MR Dec-19#13  Panel President of Massachusetts Maritime Academy,)
    December 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 13

    , resiliency. but the maritime sector as a whole. Echoing Alfultis, RADM Francis X. McDonald, MRS ’19: “The Presidents” Panel President of Massachusetts Maritime Academy, “The decrease in state spending on higher edu- said his state funding for Mass Maritime is in the cation is what keeps me awake

  • MR Dec-19#12  X. McDonald, President of Massachusetts Maritime Academy,)
    December 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 12

    , President, SUNY Maritime College; RADM Michael E. Fossum, Superintendent, Texas A&M Maritime Academy; and RADM Francis X. McDonald, President of Massachusetts Maritime Academy, and panel moderator RADM Fred Rosa (USCG, Ret.), Johns Hopkins APL. Photos: SUNY Maritime College & Maritime Reporter 12

  • MR Dec-19#4  (Deck) graduate of the Massachusetts  reports from his)
    December 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 4

    industry publications in the Nor- Keefe wegian capital. He has written thousands of offshore-focused Joseph Keefe is a 1980 (Deck) graduate of the Massachusetts reports from his North Sea vantage point. William lives and Maritime Academy and editor of MarineNews. works in Oslo. He started writing for

  • MR Nov-19#20  programs. The Maryland  by Massachusetts came from this fund)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 20

    sociations. $200,000 of the awards made the United States is growing wind turbine manufacturers and opera- development programs. The Maryland by Massachusetts came from this fund. exponentially, with multiple tors. GWO created training standards are Energy Administration introduced the Ørsted and

  • MR Nov-19#4  (Deck) graduate of the Massachusetts 
Maritime Academy)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 4

    and electronic. MarineLMS. Poulter Keefe Scott Poulter is founder & CEO of Paci? c Green Technologies. Joseph Keefe is a 1980 (Deck) graduate of the Massachusetts Maritime Academy and editor of MarineNews. Stoichevski William Stoichevski is MR’s correspondent in Norway. Member Knight F. Daniel Knight is

  • MT Oct-19#45   (DKP) embayment.
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    October 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 45

    SeaTrac’s new SP-48 production model ASV. Buddy Duncan, SeaTrac. The Duxbury, Kingston and Plymouth (DKP) embayment. Credit: Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries www.marinetechnologynews.com Marine Technology Reporter 45 MTR #8 (34-49).indd 45 10/8/2019 9:57:24 AM